S.J. O'Hart

Writer. Represented by Polly Nolan (@NolanPolly) of The Greenhouse Literary Agency.

“We read books to find out who we are. What other people, real or imaginary, do and think and feel… is an essential guide to our understanding of what we ourselves are and may become.”

– Ursula K. Le Guin (via wordsnquotes)

micdotcom:

guardian:

United Nations officials described the killing of sleeping children as a disgrace to the world and accused Israel of a serious violation of international law after a school in Gaza being used to shelter Palestinian families was shelled on Wednesday.
• Full story here

Powerful.

#stopthekilling

micdotcom:

guardian:

United Nations officials described the killing of sleeping children as a disgrace to the world and accused Israel of a serious violation of international law after a school in Gaza being used to shelter Palestinian families was shelled on Wednesday.

Full story here

Powerful.

#stopthekilling

This is The End*

This is The End*

Firstly, apologies for neglecting this blog yesterday. I know some of you were probably expecting a new short story, as I’ve been rather in the habit of promising a new tidbit of flash fiction every Wednesday for the past while, but I hope you’ll find it in your hearts to forgive me.

Photo Credit: butupa via Compfight cc

Photo Credit: butupa via Compfight cc

I wanted to blog yesterday. Honestly. I sat with prompt images for almost an…

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micdotcom:

5 human rights tragedies you can help stop right now

Online activism has drawn criticism for making a lot of noise without the ability to create real change. But charges of slacktivism aren’t always fair: A robust online conversation can educate and inspire change. 

So how do we actually impact the situations that garner our outrage online? Your best bet is to donate to a cause, but with so many campaigns out there, it is sometimes to difficult to work out which one will actually make a change on the ground. 

What you can do about these instantly | Follow micdotcom

#STOPKILLINGPEOPLE

thepenguinpress:

Via Flavorwire
The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet
Zadie Smith
No Twitter, no personal blog, and close to 35k fans following the Facebook page that her publisher runs for her; Zadie Smith really has zero personal Internet presence, save for maybe her sporadic posts on the New York Review of Books website. Yet while Smith might not have a clever Twitter handle, she’s all over social media proxy, with her many fans sharing quotes, articles, and her live talks (with fellow Internet-shy authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie or Karl Ove Knausgård) all the time. She’s one of the few big-name writers who has managed to develop a huge Internet presence without even seeming to spend much time online.
Neil Gaiman
It isn’t simply the over two million Twitter followers that make Gaimain an online powerhouse — it’s that he seems to genuinely enjoy interacting with his fans. The fact is, he had a massive following long before anyone knew what “social media” was, and doesn’t really need to tweet or use his Tumblr with such frequency to promote his work. That he spends so much time online, regardless, is what makes his noticeable presence very welcome.
John Green
Have you ever gone to Tumblr and looked at how many posts are tagged “John Green“? It’s a rabbit hole worth falling down at least once. Then there’s the 2.85 million people who follow him on Twitter — making Green easily one of the most popular writers on the Internet, and one who’s always interacting with fans.
Rachel Fershleiser 
A book evangelist, Fershleiser spends her days doing literary and nonprofit outreach at Tumblr, and takes any chance she can to talk about the “Bookternet.” She tweets all the time, has given a TEDx talk on the literary Internet, and, of course, she’s very active on Tumblr.
See the rest of the list here!

thepenguinpress:

Via Flavorwire

The 35 Writers Who Run the Literary Internet

Zadie Smith

No Twitter, no personal blog, and close to 35k fans following the Facebook page that her publisher runs for her; Zadie Smith really has zero personal Internet presence, save for maybe her sporadic posts on the New York Review of Books website. Yet while Smith might not have a clever Twitter handle, she’s all over social media proxy, with her many fans sharing quotes, articles, and her live talks (with fellow Internet-shy authors Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie or Karl Ove Knausgård) all the time. She’s one of the few big-name writers who has managed to develop a huge Internet presence without even seeming to spend much time online.

Neil Gaiman

It isn’t simply the over two million Twitter followers that make Gaimain an online powerhouse — it’s that he seems to genuinely enjoy interacting with his fans. The fact is, he had a massive following long before anyone knew what “social media” was, and doesn’t really need to tweet or use his Tumblr with such frequency to promote his work. That he spends so much time online, regardless, is what makes his noticeable presence very welcome.

John Green

Have you ever gone to Tumblr and looked at how many posts are tagged “John Green“? It’s a rabbit hole worth falling down at least once. Then there’s the 2.85 million people who follow him on Twitter — making Green easily one of the most popular writers on the Internet, and one who’s always interacting with fans.

Rachel Fershleiser 

A book evangelist, Fershleiser spends her days doing literary and nonprofit outreach at Tumblr, and takes any chance she can to talk about the “Bookternet.” She tweets all the time, has given a TEDx talk on the literary Internet, and, of course, she’s very active on Tumblr.

See the rest of the list here!

Use Your Words. Please.

Use Your Words. Please.

It feels almost frivolous to write blog posts about my rarefied life in a world where people are being bombed out of existence and passenger jets are being shot out of the sky and genocides are quietly, systematically going on in various corners of the world and a virulent disease of horrific proportions is cutting a swathe through the people of West Africa. In fact, it doesn’t just feel frivolou…

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teachingliteracy:

what you don’t see is is all the books behind the ones you do see and i need new shelves and my mother’s screaming that it’s mad that i have more books than clothes but who needs pants when i have books?
(hahaha!  thanks for sharing, zaedilux!)

Beautiful #shelfie…

teachingliteracy:

what you don’t see is is all the books behind the ones you do see and i need new shelves and my mother’s screaming that it’s mad that i have more books than clothes but who needs pants when i have books?

(hahaha!  thanks for sharing, zaedilux!)

Beautiful #shelfie…